IOTA To Revolutionize The Internet Of Things With LiFi Technology For Lightning Speed

The IOTA is disclosing more details on its approach to powering the Internet of Things at lightning speed with its LiFi technology.

More than 26 billion devices will be linked to the Internet by 2020, says the research firm Gartner. That paves the way for a whole new dimension of digital intelligence, where you can transfer massive volumes of data from one device to another with no human-to-human or human-to-computer interactions. That may well dramatically impact the way we live, building smart cities and reshaping virtually all industries, from the producing industries and agriculture to supply chain management and healthcare.

IOTA is attempting to leverage its distributed general ledger technology to power the revolution of the Internet of Things and link billions of devices together and surmount a significant bottleneck, namely, the bandwidth.

Currently, the more devices are connected, the more limitations occur. On WiFi networks, for example, only three channels can operate concurrently without a glitch.

IOTA works on LiFi technology to power the Internet of Things at lightning speed

To tackle the bandwidth bottleneck, IOTA is currently investigating the full capabilities of LiFi, a relatively new technology that makes use of the light spectrum and generates infinite channels.

LiFi is a technology developed to harness existing LED technology to transmit data at lightning speed.

Bandwidth is undoubtedly the last bottleneck. I can’t do anything about the speed of light. But the theoretical limits of LiFi are in terabytes per microsecond in the magnitude range.

IOTA Ecosystem Fund Director John Licciardello, on Reddit

On Discord, according to Hello IOTA, an IOTA code developer also debated the advancements LiFi could bring to the Internet of Things. On the other hand, the IOTA founder David Sonstebo also talked about the LiFi technology on Twitter.

No, we always stress that the speed of LIGHT cannot be exceeded. The coordinator is not part of the IOTA protocol, it is an integration tool.

David Sonstebo, on Twitter

Jackson Bey

Jackson Bey was born and raised in Lethbridge Alberta but moved east when he was 22. Apart from running his own consulting firm. Jackson spends his time canoeing the many lakes of Ontario. As a financial journalist Jackson has published stories for CBC Business Online, as well as Buzz Feed and Motherboard. As a contributor to Billionaire 365, Jackson mostly covers markets and trade.

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