Google Added “Zero Search Results” For Some Specific Queries

Google has introduced a single automatic result function, known as “zero search results,” for searches regarding different locations, mathematical calculations, or conversions of currencies or physical quantities, for which no additional link is shown in the search results. The company has confirmed for the first time this new function of its search engine and that its application is limited to its mobile version.

These type of search results, known as “zero search results,” show a unique response to the query, which is obtained through the search engine algorithm. Google has stated that they show unique results “for queries in which we have extremely high confidence that a user is looking for a calculation, unit conversion or local time.”

Also, Google shows all links by default in case the system considers that a user wants to obtain search results or if the query may give rise to ambiguities, as happens when searching for ‘New York time,’ for example, which can be interpreted as a query from the New York Times newspaper.

Google Added “Zero Search Results” For Some Specific Queries

This “zero search results” function will bring with them the option of displaying the rest of the entries by clicking on the “Show all results” tab, as confirmed by the company. In addition to that, Google has added that this function will be available on mobile devices but has not been yet implemented on the Google Chrome versions for computers.

With this change, the company aims to “help people quickly find the most relevant information” and achieve “improve loading times on the mobile” by showing a unique result. The first user to discover these search results was Search Engine Optimization (SEO) specialist Sergey Alakov. On his blog, Alakov has indicated that, in this type of query, the search engine does not display ads.

Google tested the”zero search results” feature in March and stopped displaying them after six days of user feedback. The company’s search link manager, Danny Sullivan, then published on his official Twitter that “the condensed view experiment had to stop for the moment” and that the team would assess how and when to implement it again.

Jackson Bey

Jackson Bey was born and raised in Lethbridge Alberta but moved east when he was 22. Apart from running his own consulting firm. Jackson spends his time canoeing the many lakes of Ontario. As a financial journalist Jackson has published stories for CBC Business Online, as well as Buzz Feed and Motherboard. As a contributor to Billionaire 365, Jackson mostly covers markets and trade.

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